Course Sequence

Year 1 (Fall Semester)

  • New Media, New Forms (2 credits): A big part of the creative process is the hands-on dialogue with materials. What can this dialogue look like when the materials in question are digital? New Media, New Forms explores the creative possibilities of new media in art education, the impact of technology in the art room, the changing role of the art educator, and the convergence of visual technologies. The outcome is a playful and transformative inquiry into new media and how can utilize them to create new forms.

Year 1 (Spring Semester)

  • Digital Foundations (2 credits): How do artists deploy technology in their art making and teaching? This class explores the influences of art and technology on each other and on teaching. Students make art with various new media technologies, including photo and illustration manipulation software, animation programs, game authoring platforms, web code, and the internet. The emphasis on particular technologies shifts from term to term. Please check with instructor for details.

*Students also choose an elective, which may be selected from the following:

  • Critical Perspectives & Practices in the Arts (2 credits):
  • Art/Making for Classroom Teachers (2 credits): The emergence and integration of the Maker Movement in education means different things to different teachers. In this course we will explore the Maker Movement in education from historical, theoretical, and pragmatic points of view; our goal is to learn how K-12 teachers can foster a productive and creative maker ethos in the practice. These explorations will generate material learning experiences that course participants will use to address questions that are critical to the Maker Movement in education. Our goal is to encourage and support a pragmatic and informed engagement with the Maker Movement in classrooms.
  • Current Issues & Practices: Photography for Educators (2 credits): This course is designed to help educators engage with their students through the photographic medium as well as develop their own personal photographic skills.
  • Current Issues & Practices: Video for Educators (2 credits): This course explores methods on how to use video as a tool for creative output for expression and learning the classroom. Technical components include all aspects of image production: image acquisition and digitization, basic editing, and final output. Students will be presented with readings, screenings, discussions, and basic workshops in video production tools and techniques with a focus on employing these technologies in the classroom.

Year 2 (Fall Semester)

  • Studio in Creative Technologies (2 credits): Taught in conjunction with the Digital Fabrication workshop series, students enrolled in Studio in Creative Technologies select a focus in Coding, 2D and 3D Fabrication, Physical Computing, or Electronics to develop collaborative projects with studio faculty.
  • Studio Co-requisite Workshop: Digital Fabrication I: The Digital Fabrication workshops are built into the minimum contact hours of the studio course, in which students are tasked to work collaboratively on one independent, summative semester-project, supervised by an instructor. It contains, in particular, rapid prototyping (3D-printing), laser cutting, CNC-milling, 2D and 3D modeling, physical computing, and circuitry as it pertains to art and design. The workshops will equip students with the necessary skills needed in the artistic process. Students will select from four workshops offered per semester.
  • Inquiry-based Art & Design (2 credits): This course enables a critical feedback and sequences to Studio in Creative Technologies. Addressing the confluence and opportunities of art and design, students will engage in problem identification and creative resolutions related to working with technologies. Taking concepts from Digital Foundations, students will push the boundaries further as they learn to give and receive feedback on their work in the form of critique, creating multiple art and design projects, and applying creative technologies.

Year 2 (Spring Semester)

  • Advanced Studio in Creative Technologies (2 credits): Taught in conjunction with the Digital Fabrication workshop series, students enrolled in Advanced Studio in Creative Technologies select a focus in Coding, 2D and 3D Fabrication, Physical Computing, or Electronics to develop collaborative projects with studio faculty.
  • Studio Co-requisite Workshop: Digital Fabrication II: The Digital Fabrication workshops are built into the minimum contact hours of the studio course, in which students are tasked to work collaboratively on one independent, summative semester-project, supervised by an instructor. It contains, in particular, rapid prototyping (3D-printing), laser cutting, CNC-milling, 2D and 3D modeling, physical computing, and circuitry as it pertains to art and design. The workshops will equip students with the necessary skills needed in the artistic process. Students will select from four workshops offered per semester.
  • Creative Technologies Research Seminar (3 credits): In this course, students conduct independent-driven research in creative technologies to contribute to the field’s advancement. Under faculty supervision, students prepare their research for the course colloquium series. Students will consider hybrid practices, emerging research methodologies, and ethical implications of creative technologies. Addressing media theories and history, the course makes space for student research via inquiry-based projects that reach into communities within and beyond Teachers College. A bi-weekly colloquium series will be part of the course.
  • Seminar Co-requisite: Creative Technologies Colloquium: Derived from the Latin colloqui meaning, “to talk together, the Creative Technologies Colloquium is a critical supplement to the Creative Technologies Research Seminar. At each colloquium, students will have an opportunity to present their research in an academic setting to receive feedback from their peers. Furthermore, the colloquium will incorporate outside presenters to serve as a model for students developing their own practice-based research as well as act as a networking event to meet others in the Creative Technologies field.